My after work trip to SiTE:LAB – ArtPrize 2012

I just had the most surreal experience over at the old Public Museum where sitelab has set up shop for ArtPrize. This is a building I used to visit often in my childhood. My mom liked to take me there and I had the annual school trip. I don’t think I’ve been in here since I was about 10 years old, and it has been closed to the public for most of the time while the new public museum has been open. Not only was it so strange to see that most of the things I remember about that building are still there, most of it is totally untouched. It is like a time capsule from my memory brought right back into this physical world.

I was not the only one who was feeling this way, I overheard a lot of descriptive words about other peoples’ experience, “spooky, strange, weird…” I even heard a woman say, “I’m just a little freaked out right now.”

The way the artists in this venue worked with what was already existing here is what heightens the surreality of it all. I can’t quite decide if my childhood memories made this experience more or less crazy for me. The art here is really amazing and absolutely worth looking at. This is one of 5 venues nominated for the “Best Venue” award, and I am happy to say that I agree with that whole heartedly.

I left with over 150 photos. I was there for a little over an hour. I chose just a few to show here. You really have to see this place to believe it.

Alois Kronschlaeger’s work incorporates modern sculpture into existing painted nature dioramas that were already in the museum space.

This gives a better view of the types of spaces Kronschlaeger worked with for this piece. The space shown had a ramp that allows people to walk into the diarama.

Blane De St. Croix’s work hangs from the ceiling in the main part of the museum.

This better shows the combination of use of existing space with the addition of new work.

Me with a close up of one of the numerous taxidermy animals throughout the building.

Lily Cox-Richard’s work, Strike, combines a number of lightning rods with the museum space.

This work by Complex Movement was one of my favorites. It was a pleasant surprise tucked in the back of the museum.

This work by Filippo Tagliati was really interesting. It is a combination of photographs and video. I found the photos to be really interesting to look at.

This is a close up from the ‘Not Design’ space which featured a lot of letter press.

And the Venue is…

20120521-072835.jpg

A special thank you to the owners of the Ledyard Building for hosting me in this year’s ArtPrize which begins September 19 in downtown Grand Rapids, MI. The contract is signed and I am locked in. I couldn’t ask for a more beautiful space to hang my photographs (pictured above). It is the perfect fit!

In preparation of ArtPrize

“In particular what is most important to me is the transformation of a sound by slowing it down, sometimes extremely, so that the inner of sound becomes a conceivable rhythm.”

-Karlheinz Stockhausen

When I came across this quote from Stockhausen, I had to smile because I identified with it completely. As a photographer, it has always been my goal to transform the viewer’s mind. I aspire to provide people with an opportunity to see the world they walk in everyday from a new perspective.

In the moment the viewer takes pause, a magical thing happens. They have spent at lease a few seconds breaking their usual routine to take note of something different.  When that happens, it means I have succeeded. I have at least temporarily transformed the mind of the viewer to another place, and perhaps, another time.

I have always been in love with cities, and the variety of buildings and people that create them. I make a point of taking a photo every couple of days of something I may see everyday, but still have a fascination with. Living in Grand Rapids, Michigan and working downtown is very inspiring to me, and I use my photography to show the beauty of the city.

Shooting in black and white is my medium of choice. It strips away the distractions and reveals the soul of what you are looking at. It also helps to create a feel of timelessness. Many of these photographs would be difficult to label with an age if I hadn’t told you I shot them all in 2012.

Each photo has it’s own story to tell, and as a collection these images depict a day in the life of an ordinary person. Reminding us all that there is magic to be found in the most ordinary of things, and that by taking a moment to slow your mind, you may discover something you had never imagined.

A thesis for all of these photos!

“In particular what is most important to me is the transformation of a sound by slowing it down, sometimes extremely, so that the inner of sound becomes a conceivable rhythm.”

-Karlheinz Stockhausen

  

When I came across this quote from Stockhausen, I had to smile because I identified with it completely. As a photographer, it has always been my goal to transform the viewer’s mind. I aspire to provide people with an opportunity to see the world they walk in everyday from a new perspective.

In the moment the viewer takes pause, a magical thing happens. They have spent at lease a few seconds breaking their usual routine to take note of something different.  When that happens, it means I have succeeded. I have at least temporarily transformed the mind of the viewer to another place, and perhaps, another time.

I have always been in love with cities, and the variety of buildings and people that create them. I make a point of taking a photo every couple of days of something I may see everyday, but still have a fascination with. Living in Grand Rapids, Michigan and working downtown is very inspiring to me, and I use my photography to show the beauty of the city.

Shooting in black and white is my medium of choice. It strips away the distractions and reveals the soul of what you are looking at. It also helps to create a feel of timelessness. Many of these photographs would be difficult to label with an age if I hadn’t told you I shot them all in 2012.

Each photo has it’s own story to tell, and as a collection these images depict a day in the life of an ordinary person. Reminding us all that there is magic to be found in the most ordinary of things, and that by taking a moment to slow your mind, you may discover something you had never imagined.